Newsletter

  • A red traffic light stands in front of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington

    Spending Caps Could Come Roaring Back in 2020

    Congress has busted through its self-imposed spending caps for this year and next, enabling the government to spend billions more that the limits imposed by the Budget Control Act of 2011. The...

  • U.S. President Trump talks with U.S. Army Major General Piatt during demonstration at Fort Drum, New York

    Cost of Trump’s Military Parade Rising Fast

    It looks like President Trump’s military parade is going to cost a lot more than the initial estimate suggested – about $80 million more. The Department of Defense pegged the cost of the parade at...

  • How the Tax Cuts Could Raise Wages – and Why They Might Not

    Wages don’t seem to be rising in the wake of the corporate tax cuts that went into effect this year, and many critics of the GOP tax overhaul say there’s little reason to think they will. But the...

  • Quote of the Day: When Tax Cuts Pay for Themselves

    “You … often hear the claim that a lot of tax cuts will ‘pay for themselves,’ that they’ll cause so much additional economic activity that the revenue feedback from that activity will fully offset...

  • Starting in June, the newly unemployed aren't eligible to get a federal subsidy for health care, while the proposal to extend subsidies to those laid off through the end of the year is languishing in Congress.

    States Push Back Against Short-Term Health Care Plans

    The Trump administration is promoting short-term health care plans as a cheaper alternative to Obamacare, but some state regulators are pushing back against the expanded use of the plans, which...

  • Are Tax Revenues Really Rising?

    A Wall Street Journal editorial this past weekend took aim at the idea that the Republican tax cuts have much to do with rising deficits. “Perhaps you’ve read that the federal budget deficit is...

  • A man walks his dog past a mural depicting factory workers in the historic Pullman neighborhood in Chicago November 20, 2014.      REUTERS/Andrew Nelles/File Photo

    Economic Growth Gets a Downgrade

    The Congressional Budget Office reduced its estimate for the growth rate of the U.S. economy in 2018 to 3.1 percent, down from its estimate of 3.3. percent in April. The CBO’s estimate for 2019...